Charity fund – TWN Online http://twnonline.org/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:02:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://twnonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Charity fund – TWN Online http://twnonline.org/ 32 32 Public service workers have 6 weeks to apply for student loan repayment waiver https://twnonline.org/public-service-workers-have-6-weeks-to-apply-for-student-loan-repayment-waiver/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:02:51 +0000 https://twnonline.org/public-service-workers-have-6-weeks-to-apply-for-student-loan-repayment-waiver/ WASHINGTON, DC – August 24: US President Joe Biden, joined by Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, … [+] speaks about student loan debt in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on August 24, 2022 in Washington, DC. President Biden announced measures to forgive $10,000 in student loan debt for borrowers who earn less than $125,000 […]]]>

Borrowers who want student loan forgiveness for public service work have a rapidly shrinking window to seek relief under a temporary waiver. The Biden administration has updated key guidelines for the program, clarifying what borrowers must do to apply.

Here is the latest.

Student Loan Forgiveness For Public Service Borrowers Ends Next Month

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) provides federal student loan forgiveness to borrowers who have dedicated their careers to public service work. Borrowers who work for 10 or more years for public or nonprofit organizations while meeting other (sometimes complicated) program requirements can have their entire federal student loan balance forgiven.

But PSLF has been plagued with problems for years due to complex regulations, administrative oversight issues and poor account management by loan officers. Approval rates barely exceeded two percent.

In response to these issues, last year the Biden administration signed into law the Limited PSLF Waiver, a move that temporarily relaxes many of the strict rules of the PSLF program. Specifically, the PSLF Limited Waiver allows the Department of Education to retroactively credit large prior loan periods (including certain deferment and forbearance periods) toward a borrower’s loan forgiveness term under of the PSLF which may have been previously rejected.

But the limited PSLF waiver is a temporary program and is due to expire on October 31 – in just over six weeks. Student borrower advocacy groups and Democratic lawmakers have urged the Biden administration to extend the deadline, but so far administration officials have given no indication that an extension is coming. Meanwhile, millions of borrowers who could benefit from the waiver initiative have yet to take action.

Department of Education updates limited PSLF waiver guidelines

With just six weeks left until the limited PSLF waiver expires, advocates are growing concerned that millions of borrowers who just learned of the initiative could miss the boat by receiving relief. Many borrowers will need to take specific steps by October 31 to qualify for PSLF credit and loan forgiveness. Specifically:

  • Borrowers with FFEL program loans should consolidate those loans through the Federal Direct Consolidation Loan Program.
  • Borrowers who have not submitted the PSLF employment certification forms for every civil service employer they have had should do so.

Both of these steps can take time, and even more time for the education department. Borrowers and advocates fear that if direct loan consolidation and employment certification are not completed as of October 31, borrowers would lose PSLF relief.

This month, the Ministry of Education updated its guidance on limited PSLF exemption and clarified that borrowers must submit their relevant applications by October 31 to qualify for the limited PSLF waiver, but these applications do not have to be treaty by the Department of Education on that date for borrowers to receive relief.

For Direct Loan Consolidation, the Department of Education states, “If you have FFEL, Perkins, or other types of loans that are not Direct Loans, your Consolidation Application must be submitted online through StudentAid.gov before 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on October 31, 2022, so that you can receive the benefits of the PSLF Limited Waiver.

For PSLF Employment Attestation forms, the Education Department asks borrowers to “use the PSLF Helper Tool before October 31, 2022, to generate a PSLF form that will ultimately be approved. [The Education Department] will keep a record if you have completed all steps of the PSLF Support Tool by October 31, 2022, but you must still print, sign, have your employer sign, and submit the PSLF form to MOHELA, the PSLF service.

Alternatively, borrowers can submit a manual PSLF form (not generated by the PSLF Helper Tool) signed by the borrower’s employer, but it “must be dated October 31, 2022 or earlier, and this form must be subsequently approved, for the borrower to receive PSLF credit. The Department of Education states that “[t]To receive the benefits of the PSLF Limited Waiver, the employer signature and date on your PSLF form must be on or before October 31, 2022, even if you submit your form at a later date… If the signed date by the authorized representative of your employer of record is on or after November 1, 2022, normal program requirements for PSLF” apply.

Resources for Borrowers Seeking Student Loan Forgiveness Through a PSLF Waiver

Borrowers can learn more about the limited PSLF waiver hereor PSLF more generally here.

Use the online consolidation tool if you need to consolidate your loans through the direct consolidation program, or the PSLF Helper Tool start working on the PSLF Employment Attestation Forms. The Department of Education has also released a new PSLF employer search tool for borrowers who are unsure if their job qualifies.

Further Reading on Student Loans

When can borrowers expect student loan forgiveness under Biden’s new plan?

134 groups urge Biden to extend expiring student loan forgiveness initiatives, while top officials tell borrowers to apply now

Student loan borrowers should note these critical dates for loan cancellation and repayment

Biden’s student loan forgiveness could be taxable in some states

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Experts analyze GOP governors’ letter to Biden on student loan forgiveness https://twnonline.org/experts-analyze-gop-governors-letter-to-biden-on-student-loan-forgiveness/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 21:15:21 +0000 https://twnonline.org/experts-analyze-gop-governors-letter-to-biden-on-student-loan-forgiveness/ Earlier this week, more than 20 Republican governors signed on a letter calling on President Joe Biden to cancel his plan to relieve certain types of federal student loan debt. On Wednesday, Governor Glenn Youngkin’s signature was added. According to his spokesperson, Macaulay Porter, there was a delay in processing his signature for the letter. […]]]>

Earlier this week, more than 20 Republican governors signed on a letter calling on President Joe Biden to cancel his plan to relieve certain types of federal student loan debt.

On Wednesday, Governor Glenn Youngkin’s signature was added. According to his spokesperson, Macaulay Porter, there was a delay in processing his signature for the letter.

VPM News asked some experts to unpack some of the claims included in the letter.

Claim #1: Biden’s loan forgiveness program will “further encourage students to borrow, incentivize higher tuition fees, and further drive up inflation.”

David Feldman – an economics professor at William & Mary – said the likelihood of the plan causing a surge in inflation is “extremely low, nil”. He said the idea that the policy would make inflation worse “is very poorly supported in theory and not at all in evidence” because the impact of loan forgiveness on how much people are currently spending is very small.

Also, he points out: “The same statement can be made about any program of public spending. Does SNAP contribute to inflation? And the Department of Defense? I mean, you could say that every federal expenditure is just as causally linked to inflation as this relatively small debt forgiveness. So I think the inflation argument is a duck.

Regarding incitement to higher tuition rates, Feldman said the letter attempted to invoke Bennett’s hypothesiswho argues that colleges will increase tuition when financial aid increases.

Feldman said: “The best studies that pay great attention to statistical methods have shown that there is very little or no impact [on tuition rates after] an increase in the federal subsidy. And it’s not even an increase in federal grants, it’s just debt forgiveness. But an increase in the federal grant, such as adding to the Pell grant or allowing students to borrow more… the evidence that this contributes to an increase in tuition – the list price printed in the catalog – is concentrated in a sector of the higher education system and it is the for-profit.

“There is very little credible evidence that allowing students to borrow more or add to the Pell Grant does anything about public university pricing.”

Claim #2: “Shifting the burden of debt from the wealthy to working Americans has a regressive impact that hurts low-income families. »

Feldman said that claim is flawed because the wealthiest Americans — those in the top 5% — will not benefit from Biden’s plan. Meanwhile, those who will benefit are the one-third of borrowers nationwide who have student loan debt under $10,000.

“Who are these people who have these relatively small amounts of debt? It’s not the doctors and lawyers and business professors,” Feldman said. “The overwhelming majority are people who were enticed to try college. They tried it for a semester or a year, borrowed $9,000 in the attempt, decided it wasn’t for them and left college with no degree, no degree and $10,000 in debt.These are people whose financial lives [have been] upside down and don’t have many other ways to fix it. »

Feldman also pointed out that the debt picture is very different from what it was 30 or 40 years ago. The “constant withdrawal of states from funding their public institutions” has caused more students – even those attending community colleges – to have to borrow in ways they did not have to borrow in the past, said Feldmann.

James Murphy, senior policy analyst at Education Reform Now, points out that while the state of Virginia covered 77% of the cost of public higher education in 2001, it covered 48% in 2019.

“Previous generations went to college at a time when states were investing a lot more in public higher education,” Murphy said.

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San Diego makes huge investments in stormwater infrastructure with EPA loan https://twnonline.org/san-diego-makes-huge-investments-in-stormwater-infrastructure-with-epa-loan/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 01:04:00 +0000 https://twnonline.org/san-diego-makes-huge-investments-in-stormwater-infrastructure-with-epa-loan/ San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria on Tuesday signed a loan with the Environmental Protection Agency to repair the city’s aging storm drain system. The loan will invest up to $733 million in stormwater infrastructure projects over the next five years. This is one of the biggest infrastructure investments of recent years. The mayor’s signature kicked […]]]>

San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria on Tuesday signed a loan with the Environmental Protection Agency to repair the city’s aging storm drain system.

The loan will invest up to $733 million in stormwater infrastructure projects over the next five years. This is one of the biggest infrastructure investments of recent years. The mayor’s signature kicked off the first installment of $225 million.

The loan will finance more than 80 projects.

“Our stormwater system is largely underground and out of sight, but the implications of failing this aging infrastructure are enormous – from severe flooding in our neighborhoods to pollution of our bays and the ocean” , Gloria said in a statement. “While replacing storm sewers and upgrading pump stations may not garner the public attention like repairing potholes, these major investments in critical infrastructure are extremely important to our neighborhoods and our quality of life. »

This was demonstrated last weekend when the remnant of Hurricane Kay brought much needed rain to the area.

“After rain like the one we had this weekend, we see a lot of visible and invisible pollutants like animal waste, plastics, metals, other chemicals from runoff,” Lucero Sanchez said. of the San Diego Coastkeeper, an environmental group dedicated to protecting the area’s waterways.

She said it’s a start, but with the $274 million shortfall in stormwater infrastructure each year, the city needs to find a long-term solution.

“Yes, $733 million is a lot, but … it’s just a drop in the bucket when it comes to the stormwater infrastructure that we need,” Sanchez said. “It continues to grow every year.”

The city has a $1.4 billion stormwater infrastructure deficit. The EPA loan will cover about 49% of the deficit. The rest of the 51% will come from grants, loans and “other methods of financing”, according to the city.

Bethany Bezak, acting director of the stormwater department, said the low-interest loan will help improve residents’ quality of life.

“What will be financed under this loan will include pipe repair projects, failed underground pipes, stormwater restoration, rehabilitation, watershed projects that will truly benefit the environment and to the citizens of San Diego,” she said.

The projects funded will contribute to reducing the pollution of waterways.

The EPA’s Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) was created in 2014 to promote improvements in water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure. The City of San Diego was one of 60 municipalities qualified to apply for the loan in 2021.

“By investing in its water infrastructure, the EPA is helping San Diego protect its communities from potential flooding and prevent untreated stormwater runoff into local waterways.” EPA Deputy Assistant Administrator for Water Bruno Pigott said in a statement.

Projects funded by the $733 million loan include:

  • $552 million to replace aging metal pipes with reinforced concrete pipes that last 100 years;
  • $91 million for watershed revitalization and restoration to improve water quality;
  • $36 million for green infrastructure projects to eliminate pollution and support the greening of urbanized communities;
  • $30 million to upgrade pump stations critical to neighborhood flood prevention; and
  • $24 million to rehabilitate and replace deteriorating stormwater management infrastructure.

The city won’t be expected to return the money until decades later, Bezak said.

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Student loan scams: information and prevention https://twnonline.org/student-loan-scams-information-and-prevention/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 09:03:03 +0000 https://twnonline.org/student-loan-scams-information-and-prevention/ With President Joe Biden’s announcement of the student debt relief package on August 24, which extends the pause on student loan repayments and offers up to $20,000 in loan forgiveness, some scam artists have taken advantage of opportunity to take advantage of those with student loans. According to the local Better Business Bureau’s online scam […]]]>
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When it comes to federal loan cancellation plan, NH residents barely see a dent in their record debt https://twnonline.org/when-it-comes-to-federal-loan-cancellation-plan-nh-residents-barely-see-a-dent-in-their-record-debt/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 16:55:31 +0000 https://twnonline.org/when-it-comes-to-federal-loan-cancellation-plan-nh-residents-barely-see-a-dent-in-their-record-debt/ Alessandro Morales’ plan after graduating from the University of New Hampshire was to transfer to graduate school to pursue a career in public education. However, the expense of earning his first degree stopped him on the path to pursuing a second. Morales graduated in May with $82,000 in private loans and $20,000 in federal loans […]]]>

Alessandro Morales’ plan after graduating from the University of New Hampshire was to transfer to graduate school to pursue a career in public education.

However, the expense of earning his first degree stopped him on the path to pursuing a second.

Morales graduated in May with $82,000 in private loans and $20,000 in federal loans after paying in-state tuition for four years. UNH has one of the highest attendance costs for public universities in the nation, costing New Hampshire students more than $35,000 a year in tuition and fees before financial aid.

Even if President Joe Biden’s student debt relief becomes a reality — with up to $10,000 in forgiveness for those earning less than $125,000 and $20,000 in loan forgiveness for Pell Grant recipients — the vast majority of Morales’ debt will remain even though he qualified for a Pell Grant his freshman year.

“While $20,000 seems significant to many graduates, it only covers a fraction of all loans,” he said. “People like me who have private loans are unaffected by the federal loan cancellation.”

Morales now works as a teller at TD Bank to reduce his debt before applying for graduate school. He hopes to launch a graduate program in the fall of 2023, funding it primarily through stipends and other grants.

He’s already using his paycheck to pay off the debt he accumulated while earning his history degree.

“Even with a higher hourly wage than most jobs, I struggle to cover student loan payments as well as other living expenses,” he said.

Morales is not alone. In New Hampshire, 70% of graduates from all colleges and universities have student debt, which is the second highest rate in the nation.

Granite State — which contributes the least to higher education of all states — also has the highest average student debt in the nation at $39,950. These factors combine to create a young working class in the state that has less money to buy cars and houses and start a family.

In-State Tuition

When Daisy Young applied to college, she thought of UNH as a fallback option to the five or six other schools she had applied to.

But when she weighed the cost of her college education, knowing she would have to take out and repay loans on her own, it turned out to be her most affordable option.

“We’re kind of right in the middle of the gap where we can’t actually afford to pay the expected family contribution that the FAFSA wants us to make, and then we don’t get enough money from the schools to actually be able to go,” she said. said. “So I just couldn’t afford the other schools.”

Young, who is currently a senior at UNH, will graduate in May with about $30,000 in federal loans.

New Hampshire is a notoriously expensive state for residents, like Young, to earn a four-year undergraduate degree. The average cost of annual attendance at public universities in the state is $29,222, according to the Education Data Initiative.

At the University of New Hampshire’s main campus in Durham, in-state tuition, plus room and board, is $31,700. Including transportation, books, supplies and other expenses, the cost of participation is estimated at $35,350.

Even though New Hampshire’s university system has frozen tuition in the state for the fourth straight year, it still has one of the most expensive prices in the state.

With in-state tuition exceeding the national average, approximately 44% of New Hampshire residents who attend college choose to continue their education at out-of-state schools. Only 25% of the state’s students grew up here. That’s a problem for an aging state filled with businesses desperate to hire new employees.

It’s also a problem of differing opinions on how to keep graduates here.

In 2019, an incentive program for college graduates was established by law without the governor’s signature. Employers who participate in the program agree to pay new employees at least $1,000 per year for the first four years of their employment to start their careers here.

Governor Chris Sununu, however, refused to sign the bill. His solution to graduate retention was a budget proposal for $16 million in student debt relief and a labor recruitment program.

With Biden’s pardon plan, New Hampshire residents are split on favor. In a UNH poll, 45% of respondents said they supported the plan, while 49% disagreed.

However, 63% of respondents aged 18 to 34 are in favor of canceling loans. This is often the demographic that pays off the debt, as many payment plans span 10 or 20 year periods.

Levels of indebtedness

Based on Biden’s proposed relief plan, Young would see up to $10,000 in aid.

“The student loan forgiveness would apply to me and it would definitely help,” she said. “In addition to other loans, as I have car loans that I pay off, it’s really intimidating.”

At the University of New Hampshire’s main campus, graduates left Durham with an average debt of $45,775 in 2019-20, according to The Institute for College Access and Success. Three quarters of all graduates left school with some debt.

At UNH-Manchester, 68% of graduates left school with an average debt of $29,588.

Beginning in 2017, the New Hampshire University System introduced the Granite Guarantee, which guarantees that any New Hampshire freshman eligible for a Pell Grant will pay zero tuition.

When the program was introduced, it was estimated that 21% of all New Hampshire undergraduates were eligible for Pell. In 2017, UNH expected the Granite Guarantee to help 285 students.

Currently, UNH officials say the program is helping more than 800 students.

Even with programs like the Granite Guarantee, the idea of ​​debt is hard to grasp for young students starting their undergraduate studies, Young said. Now, with graduation looming, she is faced with the reality of the choices she made four years ago.

“I don’t think you really understand what $30,000 debt is when you’re 18,” she said. “Now I look back regretting those decisions.”

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Newcastle United have rejected loan offers as plan to improve youth set-up takes shape https://twnonline.org/newcastle-united-have-rejected-loan-offers-as-plan-to-improve-youth-set-up-takes-shape/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://twnonline.org/newcastle-united-have-rejected-loan-offers-as-plan-to-improve-youth-set-up-takes-shape/ Newcastle United rejected several loan offers for Under-21 talent over the summer as they looked to improve the club’s youth set-up. The Magpies have struggled with underperforming reserve and academy teams in recent years, but have bolstered their ranks in recent months with some top-class teenager additions. Newcastle hope to build a strong base of […]]]>

Newcastle United rejected several loan offers for Under-21 talent over the summer as they looked to improve the club’s youth set-up. The Magpies have struggled with underperforming reserve and academy teams in recent years, but have bolstered their ranks in recent months with some top-class teenager additions.

Newcastle hope to build a strong base of young talent and keep them at the club, allowing them to follow a path to the first team. The likes of Jay Turner-Cooke, Matty Bondswell and Michael Ndiweni are players who have attracted interest from the lower leagues in England and other countries over the summer.

On the senior side, Elliot Anderson’s impressive performances in pre-season saw Eddie Howe keep the 19-year-old at Newcastle despite more than a dozen clubs eyeing his signature.

READ MORE: Newcastle United insert important clause in Martin Dubravka deal as goalkeeper completes Man United transfer

Chronicle Live reported earlier this summer that many offers for Lucas De Bolle had been turned down by Newcastle. The club ultimately opted to wait until the last day of the window before sanctioning his temporary exit.

Kell Watts, currently injured, was a player cleared from Tyneside for Peterborough until January, while Matty Longstaff also joined Colchester until the winter window.

The aim this season is to assess Newcastle’s young talents before making a decision on their future. Newcastle are also keen to improve their performance in Premier League 2 Division 2.

Highly rated youngsters were brought to the northeast hoping to do just that. Charlie McArthur and Alex Murphy are two defenders arriving with high reputations due to their exploits in Scotland and Ireland respectively.

Jordan Hackett was poached after his release from Tottenham, while Jude Smith was signed after impressing north of the border. Santiago Munoz and Dylan Stephenson are also expected to have a bright future.

Newcastle were interested in former Southampton sensation Tyler Dibling, who spent a brief spell at Chelsea in the summer. The Magpies also wanted to secure a West Ham deal for 20-year-old Harrison Ashby on deadline day.

Newcastle’s Under-21 side lost their first Papa John Trophy clash earlier this week and have had a rocky start to their league campaign in recent weeks. The hope is that by keeping some of the best talent at the club for the next few months, fortunes will change.

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Vice President Kamala Harris Skips Student Loan, Spends Hawaii Vacation Bill Events https://twnonline.org/vice-president-kamala-harris-skips-student-loan-spends-hawaii-vacation-bill-events/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 13:51:11 +0000 https://twnonline.org/vice-president-kamala-harris-skips-student-loan-spends-hawaii-vacation-bill-events/ Vice President Kamala Harris has been conspicuously absent from two of President Biden’s biggest White House events so far, spending time with her husband on vacation in Hawaii. Ms Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, landed in Hawaii on August 15. It was a day before Mr. Biden signed his huge bill on climate, health […]]]>

Vice President Kamala Harris has been conspicuously absent from two of President Biden’s biggest White House events so far, spending time with her husband on vacation in Hawaii.

Ms Harris and her husband, Doug Emhoff, landed in Hawaii on August 15. It was a day before Mr. Biden signed his huge bill on climate, health care and tax expenditures. The legislation was a hard-fought victory for Mr. Biden, who was eventually able to push his national platform’s signature through Congress.

While Mr. Biden was in the White House flanked by Democratic leaders in the House and Senate, Ms. Harris was thousands of miles away at a Hawaiian farmer’s market.

Earlier this week, Ms. Harris and her husband remained in Hawaii while Mr. Biden announced his administration would forgive $10,000 in federal student debt for people earning less than $125,000 and $20,000 for recipients of the Pell Grant earning less than $125,000.

Ms Harris acknowledged the event with a tweet celebrating the cancellation of student debt.

The trip to Hawaii was not announced until the second couple landed in Kauai. She was spotted hiking in a state park as well as shopping at the farmers market.

Ms. Harris’ last public event was on August 12 in her hometown of Oakland, where she delivered a speech on the future of the US space program.

Speculation about a strained relationship between Mr. Biden and Ms. Harris has dogged the White House since the start of the administration.

It was reported earlier this year that the two had only met for lunch a handful of times, although Mr Biden said he wanted it to be a weekly occurrence. When Mr Biden was vice president under former President Barack Obama, the couple regularly had lunch together.

A spokesperson for the vice president did not immediately return a request for comment.

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Our country will miss Biden’s student loan ‘forgiveness’ program https://twnonline.org/our-country-will-miss-bidens-student-loan-forgiveness-program/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 12:43:01 +0000 https://twnonline.org/our-country-will-miss-bidens-student-loan-forgiveness-program/ I was not brought up in a family with a lot of money. In fact, I was raised by a single mother. I don’t want any sympathy for that. My mother is the hardest working woman I have ever met and she instilled the work ethic in me the same way she did other values […]]]>

I was not brought up in a family with a lot of money. In fact, I was raised by a single mother. I don’t want any sympathy for that. My mother is the hardest working woman I have ever met and she instilled the work ethic in me the same way she did other values ​​that she wanted me to learn. She taught by example. Living in his house I learned that nothing is free, work is hard, you get what you earn, life isn’t fair and you pay your bills.

I took these lessons with me to the University of West Alabama where I signed my name on student aid loan agreements to help fund tuition that was not covered by my scholarship. of football. When I graduated I went to work and paid that student loan bill every month, just like I paid my monthly cell phone bill, rent payment, car payment, and insurance automobile. These loans were mine. I signed for them. I took the money. I deposited it in my account and spent it. It was my obligation to pay it back in full and that’s exactly what I did. It wasn’t easy and I certainly would have preferred to spend that money on something else, something more fun, but I knew right from wrong. My mother made sure of that.

Now President Biden wants to “forgive” student loan debt to make life easier for adults who don’t want to fulfill the obligations they incurred when they applied for, accepted, and spent their student loans. The economic calamity associated with Biden’s decision is obvious, but the impact this “pardon” program will have on the future of this nation cannot be calculated in dollars.

Biden is sending the message to Americans that your word means nothing. Your signature on a legal loan document can be ignored and then “forgiven”. You no longer have to work hard and go without luxury items until your bills are paid. Take that money you were supposed to spend on paying off your student loan and go get the latest iPhone instead. Treat yourself to a nice dinner or a vacation you didn’t think you could afford. Then sit back and wait for the government to step in and “forgive” your debts.

Biden sends a message to the waitress who works two jobs and saves money for her tuition that her hard work means nothing. She should have just taken out loans she knew she couldn’t afford, then waited for Biden’s magic pen to “forgive” that debt.

Biden also sends a message to the men and women who chose the military as a way to fund their college aspirations that their sacrifice to this nation was truly worth nothing. After all, civilians who have not chosen the military path have their debt “forgiven”. How will we ever forgive the debt we owe those who volunteered to fight for this nation and defend us against our enemies with the promise of a college education in return? Biden doesn’t care.

People learn by example and the young people of our country learn that hard work does not matter. The sacrifice is not important. Loans don’t really have to be repaid. Biden is teaching the next generation to do whatever they want, borrow money to pay for it, then wait for “forgiveness.”

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May God forgive us all for what is happening to this country.

Rep. Scott Stadthagen is an elected Republican representing Alabama’s House District 9.

]]> What Biden’s Student Loan Debt Cancellation Plan Means https://twnonline.org/what-bidens-student-loan-debt-cancellation-plan-means/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 19:26:59 +0000 https://twnonline.org/what-bidens-student-loan-debt-cancellation-plan-means/ Aaddressing the student loan debt crisis has been one of the President Joseph R. Biden’s campaign signing pledges in 2020. And for good reason: currently, Americans owe approximately $1.75 trillion in student loans. Each borrower has an average debt of $28,950. It’s a huge problem that affects the finances and well-being of millions of Americans. […]]]>
Aaddressing the student loan debt crisis has been one of the President Joseph R. Biden’s campaign signing pledges in 2020. And for good reason: currently, Americans owe approximately $1.75 trillion in student loans. Each borrower has an average debt of $28,950. It’s a huge problem that affects the finances and well-being of millions of Americans. And with federal student loan repayments set to resume on September 1, 2022 after numerous pandemic-induced extensions, many people worried about what would happen to their finances after years of not having to repay their loans.

However, today it looks like there will finally be additional relief for some of those struggling with student debt. President Biden announced a three-pronged plan to deal with the student loan crisis— in an effort to help people currently stricken with debt and tackle some of the worst parts of the current student loan system.

What’s promised in Biden’s student debt relief plan

Under the new plan, the Ministry of Education forgive up to $20,000 of debt for eligible Pell Grant recipientsand up to $10,000 for people who don’t have Pell grants. People are eligible for this debt cancellation if their income is less than $125,000 per year (or $250,000 if they are married). According CNBCat least 9 million borrowers could see their debt completely erased by this plan.

The plan includes other measures to support borrowers, including:

  • The pause on federal student loan repayments will be extended once again, until December 31, 2022.
  • A cap on monthly undergraduate student loan repayments at 5% of the borrower’s income (half the rate most borrowers pay, according to the White House.)
  • Propose a new rule that borrowers who have worked in nonprofits, the military, or federal, state, tribal, or local governments also receive credit for loan forgiveness.

The announcement still falls short of what other proponents of student debt cancellation wanted –$50,000 waived for each federal student loan borrower. That said, it’s still a positive step forward, and likely a relief for millions of Americans struggling to pay off their student loan debt. It’s also worth nothing that the Biden administration has already taken other steps to undo about $32 billion in student loan debtincluding for those who attended former for-profit colleges and severely disabled borrowers.

“President Biden has taken a giant step in solving the student debt crisis by canceling significant amounts of student debt for millions of borrowers. The positive impacts of this decision will be felt by families across the country. , especially in minority communities, and it is the single most effective action the President can take to help working families and the economy,” said Senators Chuck Schumer (NY) and Elizabeth Warren ( MA) in a joint statement on Twitter. The two Democratic senators have tirelessly lobbied the president for student debt cancellation for the past two years.

How do I know if I qualify and how do I apply?

According to Federal Student Aid (FSA) websiteHere’s how to find out if you’re eligible for the forgiveness program:

First: Do you have any outstanding federal student loans that you still owe?

Next: Do you make less than $125,000 a year? (Or if you’re married, less than $250,000 a year?)

If you answered yes to both questions, you will qualify for this debt forgiveness program.

How a lot the debt is forgiven depends on whether or not you have already received a Pell Grant (a federal undergraduate scholarship for very low-income students). If you are in debt and were a Pell grantee in college, you can get up to $20,000 in debt relief. If you did not receive a Pell grant in college, you are eligible for debt forgiveness of up to $10,000.

The FSA says around 8 million borrowers could get relief automatically, without doing anything, because the Department for Education already has data on their income that would help determine eligibility status. But an app will be released in a few weeks for those who don’t have their income data on file (or don’t know if they do), per FSA. For updates on when this app goes live, subscribe to Ministry of Education email updates here.

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Aston Villa’s £17million winger Bertrand Traore joins Istanbul Basaksehir on a shock loan move until the end of the season https://twnonline.org/aston-villas-17million-winger-bertrand-traore-joins-istanbul-basaksehir-on-a-shock-loan-move-until-the-end-of-the-season/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 06:47:16 +0000 https://twnonline.org/aston-villas-17million-winger-bertrand-traore-joins-istanbul-basaksehir-on-a-shock-loan-move-until-the-end-of-the-season/ ASTON VILLA has loaned striker Bertrand Traoré to Istanbul Başakşehir. Traore joined Villa from Lyon in 2020 for a fee of £17million. 1 Bertrand Traoré has left Aston Villa to join Turkish side Istanbul Başakşehir on loan for the seasonCredit: Instagram @avfcofficial But he hasn’t managed to find a regular place in Villa’s first team […]]]>

ASTON VILLA has loaned striker Bertrand Traoré to Istanbul Başakşehir.

Traore joined Villa from Lyon in 2020 for a fee of £17million.

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Bertrand Traoré has left Aston Villa to join Turkish side Istanbul Başakşehir on loan for the seasonCredit: Instagram @avfcofficial

But he hasn’t managed to find a regular place in Villa’s first team so far.

The former Chelsea winger has played just 48 games over that two-year span, scoring eight times and providing seven assists.

Five of those appearances have come under Steven Gerrard since taking over at Villa.

And now the underdog 26-year-old will have the chance to thrive in Turkey with Basaksenir for the season.

Villa announced his short-term departure on Twitter where they wrote: “Good luck to Bertrand Traoré, who has joined İstanbul Başakşehir on a one-season loan.”

Traore’s move to Turkey comes as Villa’s move for Watford ace Ismaila Sarr fell apart.

The Villians were close to signing Sarr – but the transfer hit a snag in the eleventh hour.

The two sides failed to agree on personal terms, which led Villa to withdraw their £25m offer for the versatile winger.

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And the Telegraph say Steven Gerrard’s side are unlikely to make another offer unless there is a huge change in Sarr’s demands.

Villa’s urgent need to attack reinforcements was evident as they crumbled against Crystal Palace at the weekend.

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